Kimble Intelligent PSA Garners Positive Reviews From Computerworld, Enterprise Times.

Leading commentators in the technology press responded positively to the launch of Kimble intelligent PSA this week. The latest version, which embeds augmented intelligence, was reviewed in widely-read titles Computerworld and Enterprise Times. News of the launch was also published in TechMarketView, and demonstrated in a Kimble webinar.

With its most recent release, Kimble continues to make use of all the capabilities of the Salesforce platform. In many cases, Kimble is the first Salesforce application for consulting organizations, which then often move to a Salesforce strategy, adopting compatible applications offered by Kimble partners, such as Sage and Fairsail (now Sage People).

Kimble is also developing its client base among some of the world’s biggest consulting organizations. It recently processed one million hours of time for a single client in one month, and on an SPI benchmark list of the fastest-growing consulting organizations, three of the top five were Kimble customers.

Computerworld columnist and thought leader Ben Kepes reviewed the launch of Kimble intelligent PSA, which surfaces patterns in data and creates “intelligent insights” for its human users. Kepes concluded: “I’d suggest that we should take Kimble’s news at face value — a seemingly useful addition to a product from a small but plucky vendor who would seem to have gained happy and satisfied customers.”

At Enterprise Times, Steve Brooks goes into deeper detail about how Kimble uses augmented  intelligence, which he also refers to as IA – intelligence amplified. “This is the first iteration of augmented intelligence and the data it draws on is customer specific. However Kimble are already working with a group of 50 customers where it has anonymised and aggregated the data. It has enabled their helpdesk to be proactive in spotting issues within clients. For example, informing them that they are currently slow at closing off month end. This is an early form of benchmarking and the intention is to ultimately use this aggregated data, with permission, to add further insights into the application.”

Brooks interviewed Kimble CMO, Mark Robinson, part of a founding team with a great deal of personal experience of the consulting industry. “He explained that most of the insights are currently built around the fiscal side of the solution. Its intention is to provide insights to less experienced people within a professional services organization who might not have the experience to spot an anomaly. The example he gave was where a consultant might be quoting for hotel costs in San Diego. If that element has been tagged, then a light bulb will appear to show them what the average price for that area or client is. Robinson gave another example stating: ‘If you are adding someone to a project and that will reduce the margin on the project the system will notify you that is the case.’”

Brooks concluded: “This release is a step ahead of its competition. With Salesforce Einstein not generally available to ISVs it is even more impressive that Kimble seems to have delivered a solution.”